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I’m a big fan of RPG’s and I’ve played many over the years. But, I am a newbie when it comes to the action/beat-em-up RPG genre. I like fighting games, but I’ve never been good at them. Learning combos take time, practice and patience; three things I don’t have much of while playing video games. I’ve never a big fan of beat-em-up action games like God of War or Devil May Cry. But, I liked Dragon’s Crown. I liked it for one simple reason: it’s really fun.

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Dragon’s Crown

Presentation

Vanillaware developed Dragon’s Crown. If you’re familiar with this very talented development studio, you know that it isn’t surprising that Dragon’s Crown packs stunning hand-drawn visuals. If you’ve never heard of Vanillaware, well now you have. Dragon Crown’s color palette is something fit for a king. Very vibrant pastels are used on every inch of this gem. The over-stylized character models are right at home, even if over-sexualized. This is a Japanese-inspired RPG. No one should be shocked that the Sorceress looks the way she does. This game is gorgeously groomed from head to toe. I can’t even begin to fathom how many hours were put into painstakingly hand draw every little animation in the game. But, my eyes are ever grateful for Vanillaware’s patient talent. Words really can’t do the presentation of this game justice. Just go buy it!

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Behold the beauty

Gameplay

It is in the gameplay department where Dragon’s Crown hits a homerun on it’s first pitch in it’s first at-bat. But, Dragon’s Crown unfortunately strikes out on it’s next time up to the plate. Not a baseball fan? Okay, let me go into full detail to explain.

First at-bat:

Dragon’s Crown has 6 unique character classes: Fighter, Wizard, Sorceress, Dwarf, Elf and Amazon. Choosing a character is a built-in difficulty level. Playing as the Sorceress is recommended for expert players, while playing as the Fighter is recommended for beginners. The character selection breaks down each character’s difficulty level. This is a very cool feature right off the top.

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Pick your character

In true RPG form, leveling up and collecting loot are at the cornerstone of gameplay in Dragon’s Crown. Leveling up is straight forward: you get experience points based off of how successfully you defeat enemies and clear levels. But, there’s a deeper caveat. You don’t have to travel back to the hub town once you complete a level. You can earn a higher experience multiplier by moving through to the next level. Keep in mind, you and your teammates will not regain any health, items, or anything else you’ve lost. Yes, this includes loot. It’s one heck of a risk/reward system. A very clever gameplay design choice that undoubtedly adds depth. You will find chests full of loot that are graded from E to S. E being the lowest rarity grade and S being the highest rarity for loot. Your NPC companion, Rannie, will collect coins and open said loot chests for you throughout your journey. But, in true Dragon’s Crown form, there’s a catch. And this catch might be what makes the game for me. You don’t know what you received when it comes to your collected loot. All you know is the grade of it. So, when you venture back to the hub town you can get your stash of loot appraised but it’s going to cost you a pretty penny. So, do you appraise your loot to see what items you got or do you sell your loot blind, without even knowing if it is the rarest item in the game? The choice is yours.

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Rannie

Every time you level up, you earn a skill point. These can be used to upgrade your character. If you’ve ever played an RPG before, this should be straight forward. Think Borderlands here. Each character has a specific set of skills you can upgrade/unlock. Then there are common cards all characters can share when it comes to skill points. Those being stats like increased health, defense, etc.

Like Borderlands, you can play Dragon’s Crown online or locally with your friends. This game is meant to play with others. If your friend’s don’t own Dragon’s Crown or if you don’t have three extra controllers, don’t fret. You will stumble upon numerous NPC’s in the game. Use them! It’s how the game is supposed to be played; four characters on the screen at all times. In a beat-em-up RPG like this, playing with your friends means hours upon hours of addictively fun gameplay.

The combat is satisfying, especially when you shake it up. There aren’t combos, per say, but you will quickly learn what moves to use in succession in order to be successful. Dragon’s Crown is NOT an easy game. It’s this challenge, the uniqueness of its characters, and it’s immensely fun way to play with your friends that make it’s gameplay second to none. Dragon’s Crown is very satisfying. Dragon’s Crown is very polished, deep and refined. Dragon’s Crown is fun! Gameplay is king when it comes to video games. It’s no surprise that this Dragon’s Crown is made out of 24-karat gameplay.

Second at-bat:

The narrator really shines in telling an old medieval-like tale of knight and dragon proportions. Well, at least from the start. About five hours into the story, you quickly pick-up on the fact that the narrator is saying the exact same thing every single time you travel to a vista you’ve been to a million times before. Luckily, you can mute the narrator in the options. Yes, you travel to the same places a million times. This is a thing, too. There are only 9 unique worlds to play through. And then there is a hub town where you can do everything from outfitting your character to resurrecting fallen players. As I’ve stated above, there are too many enemy types to count; every one of them unique. This helps playing the same levels over and over again, a bit more doable. So does the fact that enemies scale to your level. But, for someone who hates doing the same thing twice, this game will get very repetitive, very quickly. Playing with friends is a blast! Again, the gameplay is really fun and rewarding, BUT too much of a good thing can be bad.

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Poof!

You spend the first several hours, essentially doing carrier missions, learning the intricacies of the game. This is fine, but this is all story-related. You will quickly realize that the story feels cumbersome a it takes away from the stellar and insanely fun Dragon’s Crown gameplay. This is a very peculiar situation that I have never really stumbled on in a game, before. It is so strange to say that Dragon’s Crown would be better off without it’s story. But it would. The story takes you out of what makes Dragon’s Crown so good…and way too often. Especially during the first half of the game. For what it’s worth, on harder difficulties you skip the monotonous beginnings of the game. So there’s that.

This is very much a nit-pick. But, I feel like I have to mention it anyway. Dragon’s Crown is a 2D side-scrolling game. But, the screen has depth to it. Think LittleBigPlanet, if you’ve ever had the pleasure of playing as a Sackthing. I played as the Elf on my main playthrough. What makes her unique is her bow. She can shoot arrows at enemies from across the screen. In fact, Elf players are rewarded (and most effective) staying far from the action. This is where screen depth on the 2D plane becomes incredibly frustrating. So many times you feel like you’ve got an enemy lined up from across the screen. You fire the arrow and miss because the enemy isn’t actually on the same line as you are. This happens with up close melee moves, as well. But, it is more pronounced while fighting from afar.

The Verdict

Many of my colleagues were trying to get me to tip my hat for what score I was going to give Dragon’s Crown, well before I finished the game. I wouldn’t budge. But, I told them one thing: it’s really fun. And really, what more do we want in a video game?

+Gorgeous Hand-drawn Art

+Incredibly Deep Gameplay

+Numerous Replayability Options

-Very Repetitive

-Story Gets In The Way

-Can The Narrator Shut Up Already?

Dragon’s Crown: 8.5/10

 

*Dragon’s Crown is a PS3/PS Vita exclusive. I only played the PS3 copy of the game. I recommend the bigger screen for playing this game. Battle scenes get very clustered and chaotic. Anyways, Dragon’s Crown is NOT a cross-buy or cross-play game, but it is cross-save. Meaning you have to buy both versions separately if you want both the PS3 and Vita versions. Also, Vita players cannot play online co-op with PS3 players, but you can carry your game saves back and forth between PS3 and Vita. So, as you can imagine, there is only one trophy list and hence only one platinum trophy. No double plats, sorry guys!

PI!

-Kyle

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You’re in for a treat this week! Nooch tells us why Ni No Kuni might be Game of The Year. Kyle argues his case for Guacamelee being the best game he’s played so far in 2013. And, Ryan speaks directly to Miyamoto and goes hard on Nintendo in a fiery rant. Fasten your seatbelts and keep your hands inside the ride at all times…Podcast Infinite starts right now! PI!

You can listen to the podcast here!

I am on the record saying that The Last of Us is now my favorite game of all time. But, the inFAMOUS franchise is my favorite in gaming. It’s my favorite franchise for various reasons. I’ll explain why, by diving into Sucker Punch, Cole as a hero and open-world games. Let’s get to it!

Sucker Punch’d

Sucker Punch Productions, the developer of inFAMOUS, is my favorite gaming. Sucker Punch is based in Seattle, WA, and is one of thirteen Sony-owned studios. They are currently developing inFAMOUS: Second Son for the PS4. A few years ago, when Nate Fox and company began working on Second Son, Sony broke the bank and spent a ridiculous amount of money on Sucker Punch, in the form of a state-of-the-art motion capture studio. This mo-cap set is very similar to what Naughty Dog (another Sony-owned studio – made The Last of Us) has had at their disposal since the Uncharted days. This technology allows developers to literally capture performances from the character voice actors. It’s game changing. Sorry for the pun, but it really is. No longer do you have voice actors statically sitting in a sound booth. Now, it’s much more like a movie or a theatre show as the acting is both oral and physical. The biggest difference in games that use effective mo-cap are the subtleties in the characters. If a character is broken, you’ll see watery eyes and a tense mouth. It’s stunning. This leads to character depth and complexity. And in the end, a more believable illusion on your television. Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson have set the bar for mo-cap performances in The Last of Us and the slyly talented folks at Sucker Punch are ready to challenge that with Second Son. Guess who’s playing the lead male role in the next inFAMOUS? Troy Baker. Game on.

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Troy Baker & Ashley Johnson in the mo-cap studio for The Last of Us

Cole MacGrath

Cole MacGrath might be the most believable hero in any video game I’ve played. Before the events of inFAMOUS, Cole was just a normal dude. He was a mail courier. He lived paycheck to paycheck with his girlfriend, Trish and his witty best friend, Zeke. One day a package he was carrying had the Ray Sphere in it. This Ray Sphere was packed with immense energy and it exploded in Cole’s hands. It killed thousands. It demolished a good chunk of Empire City. Miraculously, Cole was not hurt. Actually, quite the opposite: he gained electric superpowers. Yes, the ability to shoot electricity out of his hands. So much for showering ever again… So Cole gains these powers and can use them for good or evil. Haven’t we heard this story before? It’s straight out of a Marvel or DC Comic, right? Wrong! Cole is a very reluctant hero. The greatest irony of inFAMOUS is that he gains these godly powers, yet he loses so much. He loses just about everything from his “mail courier life.” There’s something dark about that. There’s something real about that, even in this fictitious world. How would you respond if your world were to instantaneously change? Cole doesn’t want these powers. Neither would most of you. He acquires the “why me” syndrome. I admire Cole. A lot. He has been chewed up, spit out and to hell and back, but he still pushes forward. A reluctant embrace of his powers makes him a believable and rigid character. He has real problems, both inside and out. But, that’s okay. We all do. He’s three-dimensional, just like every one of us. Without spoiling, Cole does something (if you play with good karma) at the end of inFAMOUS 2 that puts the exclamation point on his story arc. This action shouts one thing: hero.

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The hero: Cole MacGrath

Open-world Games

I’ve been on the record say that open-world games are my favorite type of video game to play. I’ve spent hundreds of hours running around in the Assassin’s Creed games, Empire City (inFAMOUS), New Marais (inFAMOUS 2), the latter three Sly Cooper games (the OG Sucker Punch franchise), Far Cry 3, Tomb Raider, etc. It’s great fun to take on challenges and missions whenever YOU want to. Of course the games I mentioned above have linear stories, so you have to advance the narrative at some point. But, it’s so easy to get lost in these vistas. And that’s what makes open-world games so special. Beautiful and believable worlds. Worlds that feel like a main character. Worlds that live and breathe. There’s hustle and bustle, everywhere. The environment only adds to the narrative, telling a supportive story in it’s own right. All you have to do is look around. Look at the graffiti, look at the architecture, look at the people. Listen to the sounds and take in the sights. One big criticism of open-world games is that all of your freedom as a player takes away from the story because you can stall it out for as long as you want. I agree with that, up to a point. Typically open-world games are packed full of collectibles that enhance the overall story being told. Side missions/objectives that are well done will again add to the overall narrative the game is telling. It’s easy to get lost in such worlds, but when they are fully realized, getting lost is a good thing. A good thing that only adds to your experience as a player. You feel like you’re there in that place and time. It’s magical. Games boil down to gameplay. Gameplay that is tight and fun is all a gamer desires. It’s simple: inFAMOUS is fun.

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New Marais – inFAMOUS 2

inFAMOUS

The inFAMOUS franchise is packing a stellar resume. From a brilliant development team, to a believable and complex protagonist, to my favorite style of gameplay. It’s a creative and deep game that gets just about everything right. It’s a very special franchise to me. It touches me deep. So, naturally I am optimistically anxious to see what inFAMOUS: Second Son is all about. From the demos and previews I’ve seen and read, we’re teetering on ground-breaking territory when it comes to actor performance in an open-world game. And I can’t wait! In Nate Fox and Troy Baker we trust. February can’t come soon enough.

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-Kyle

Thanks for reading, guys! We’re excited for where Podcast Infinite is going. We’re just a group of friends who share a common passion, video games. Our website is really coming together and the future is very bright indeed. Email us at podcastinfinite@gmail.com to be a part of the podcast or to provide discussion topics for us! For all things Playstation, weather, hockey and food, follow me on the Twitters: @WxManKyle. I still have a few spots left on my PSN friend’s list, add me and we’ll play something! ABitOfLuck151

PI!

Respawn’s newest shooter that they showed off at E3, is called Titanfall. To start, I liked the look of Titanfall. I do think it looks kind of fun. But that’s not enough for me. I’ve seen so much praise for this game. Seeing it winning best of E3 awards and what not. Best Xbox exclusive it deserves, maybe. But far from best overall. It has extremely glaring issues to me that may or may not be problems to other gamers. And in this opinion blog, I will address them.

So I’m going to start with the smallest of problems. The graphics. They look decidedly next gen. But that’s not what I’m referring to. More so to the color scheme. For me, being a colorblind gamer graphics and colors don’t typically matter to me. I’m not fully colorblind yet. Currently, I can’t see reds and blues. They come up gray to me. In this game I don’t see a color scheme. All I see is gray. Everything comes up gray, maybe only to me, because maybe the entire stage was made up of reds and blues. But I’m told that what I was seeing was the actual color scheme of the game. To which I say: ‘Wait, Killzone got bagged on for only doing colors like brown and stuff, yet Titanfall gets praise for only gray?’ I think the graphics are a huge problem. I still play shooters like Call of Duty and stuff, despite not being able to differentiate friend from foe. Typically the game has other colors in the background and enemies look slightly different from the people on my team. If everything is gray and everyone looks the same, how am I personally supposed to know the difference between friend and foe? I know this is a small portion of a problem for most people but for me it’s critical. And if I don’t see more color, I can’t even buy Titanfall.

Now I’ll move to some bigger issues. Starting with the new single player campaign. I used to love online games. I’ve grown out of that because most people online have a bit of a superiority complex. And if I do play online, I just mute most people…typically even people who sound friendly at first. Chances are that sometime soon, they will say something that is meant to be something along the lines of ‘I’m better than you at this.’ So, I play online games less and less. Titanfall is online only. You can’t play it alone. So where’s the interest for a person like me? Or how about a friend of mine like Kyle, who only really plays single player games? The answer is simple: there is none.

This obviously means it’s an ‘always online game.’ For those that were complaining about the Xbone possibly having ‘always online,’ this is an issue. If you don’t have Internet, you can’t play Titanfall. If you have a failing internet connection, why would you even try? So, if you were one of those complaining about that, then Titanfall isn’t the game for you.

The biggest problem that I think many people are completely overlooking is, again, the no single player issue. Respawn has said it themselves, that they are trying to ‘blur the lines between single player and multiplayer.’ They’re calling it ‘a multiplayer game with a singleplayer experience,’ meaning there will be moments where the game has (for example) a ship falling out of the sky towards the overall battlefield. Here’s where I’m going to compare Titanfall to a game like Brink. Tell me how well that turned out? Very few like to play ‘objective’ in shooters. There WILL be objective in Titanfall. It’s confirmed. They have to encourage you to play it. They have to get so much right and it’s so hard to do that. If one thing falters, the whole game fails. Again, I think Titanfall looked good. But, it has to be the best at absolutely everything, since in reality it’s doing so little to be great from the start. You may be saying to yourself, ‘Well we don’t know much about this game yet so how can you say these things.’ Simply put, I’m basing everything here off of what I’ve read and seen. And everything I’ve listed seems legit.

Go ahead and leave a comment below if you have a thought on anything I said above and feel free to elaborate on it, if you so desire. I’m really interested in seeing why people believe this game deserves the praise it’s getting. If you want, can follow me on Twitter: @undertheh00d. That’s two zeros and not two O’s. I’ll talk about relatively anything. Thank you for reading and have a good day!

-Ryan

What’s up All-stars? Click here to listen to the podcast. This week’s show was recorded early in the week, due to schedule shake-ups. We’re dubbing this the “bromance episode” as Nooch is M.I.A. That means it’s just Ryan and Kyle at the helm. Find out why Nooch is missing and what he’s up to! We also discuss the latest Playstation All-stars debacle, why we dislike Titanfall and oh yes, Playstation All-stars High is in full swing! We also have big news regarding our website: podcastinfinite.wordpress.com and an upcoming theme song and logo! Come on by and give it a listen! PI!

The Last of Us is arguably the most anticipated game of the year. It is probably the final huge release for the PS3 and is the perfect way for the PS3 to go out strong. You see, The Last of Us isn’t a normal gaming experience. It is an experience that will surely be remembered as one of the best games for years to come. It brings together some of the greatest graphics ever seen with fantastic gameplay and an amazingly well-written and superbly acted story. It is the epitomy of great presentation fitted with extremely satisfying gameplay that work in tandem with each other to bring you what I consider to be the greatest gaming experience of all time.

Presentation

The Last of Us, as I said, looks fantastic. It is, in fact, one of the best looking games ever made. There are little details everywhere that add to the dark and desolate setting of the post-apocalyptic United States. There are plants growing all over the world that make the empty world feel much emptier. The Clickers and Runners that roam the world are incredibly detailed and are terrifying. The clicking from the Clickers never fail to intensify the moment and make you much more afraid of your surroundings. The music in the game also adds a layer of fear and sadness to the game. The music always fits perfectly with the moment in the game, whether it be sad, terrifying, or funny. I found myself going back to listen to the game’s soundtrack over and over because of how much it adds to the story. The game also has fantastic voice acting. Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson are the stars of the show as Joel and Ellie, to go along with an amazing supporting cast that each brings a unique personality to the story and never feels like a repetitive character. All of these characters are given a fantastic set of dialogue to work with that make you think about the real world and keep you thinking long after the game is over. Finally, the game runs virtually seamlessly. An occasional hitch in sound happens, but never removes you from the experience. The game always finds a new way to keep you in the experience in some way, whether it be a new character, a new setting, or a plot twist, there is always something there to keep the game fresh and exciting and it always makes you want to keep going.

Story

If there is one thing to say about The Last of Us, it is that its story is one of the most dark, sad, and emotional tales in all of gaming and entertainment as a whole. The game takes place twenty years after the outbreak of the fungus Cordyceps infects humans. The game takes you on a cross-country journey to deliver Ellie to a group called the Fireflies. The game is an emotional roller coaster. It goes from sadness to anger to humor and back again. All of these are included in the game perfectly without any sudden changes in tone or pacing. It always manages to stay as one tone for the right amount of time without becoming overwhelming. The game is overall a very dark and tenebrous game, however there are the moments of joke telling that make the game a little bit brighter in the time of darkness. There are also plot twists all over the place. The game rarely goes in the path you expect it to go and has a few jaw-dropping moments that I couldn’t stop thinking about days afterwards. As I said, you meet new characters fairly often and they all have their own personality and their own unique dialogue that fits them. They all have the same goal – survival-, yet they all have a different way of achieving it. This makes the game interesting and unique. Travelling with these characters as Joel and Ellie get to know them is a good time. Finally, the ending, without spoiling anything, makes you think about decisions in life. They make you think about morality and what “good” and “evil” actually are. The end will make an impact on the way you think about things and will stick with you for a significant amount of time.

Multiplayer

I wasn’t a huge fan of Naughty Dog’s previous multiplayer experiences. Uncharted 2 and 3’s multiplayers seemed to lack the main part of what makes the overall experience a great package- the story. The Last of Us’ multiplayer brings in a reason to keep playing by bringing a pseudo-story in to the multiplayer. It lets you pick between the Hunters and the Fireflies both with a 12-week journey for survival. As you play through your matches, you collect parts and rations for your clan that you run in order to try to gain survivors and keep people healthy. This makes you want to keep playing the multiplayer to keep increasing your clan size and healing the sick of your clan. There are also malicious attacks of diseases and from the other group that you try to fight off with certain challenges to keep the multiplayer fresh and interesting. The multiplayer also brings in many of the aspects of the single player experience as central gameplay elements. It encourages stealth and crafting, both of which are main aspects of the single player campaign. Its has two modes: Supply Raid and Survivors. Supply Raid is a Team Deathmatch-esque game type with each team having a limited amount of spawns. Survivors makes each player have only one spawn. Each game type encourages teamwork. Nevertheless, multiplayer is overall a very fun experience. It has an innovative story mode that keeps you wanting to come back for more every time. It uses the fun and satisfying gameplay of the campaign to its advantage and encourages teamwork and other key elements of the story for victory and for the continued increase in clan size. I wasn’t sure about the multiplayer at first, but it really surprised me and I will definitely go back for much more.

Gameplay

The gameplay is one aspect of the game that truly shines over Naughty Dog’s past games. The Uncharted series was not well known because of its gameplay and, in fact, the gameplay was the most criticized part of Uncharted. However, Naughty Dog has made extreme refinements to the system that makes the gameplay much more satisfying and fun than any of their previous games. The shooting, to start, is extremely intense and well-done. Trying to shoot a clicker while it is sprinting at you is terrifying and when that clicker finally goes down, it is very satisfying. The Infected are, as I said, terrifying, and take a much different approach than human enemies. The game emphasizes stealth for both enemies, but it is much more prevalent with the Infected. The stealth in the game is masterful. It is extremely satisfying to go through an area of enemies without them seeing you and adds replay value to try and find the perfect way to go through. Even though the game is technically linear, there are many ways to go through any specific area. However, the fear you get during an encounter with Clickers is unmatched in any recent game. Finally, the game encourages crafting as part of the main gameplay aspects. Joel scours areas looking for supplies to make a new shiv or med kit. As supplies are extremely limited, crafting is a strategic experience and careful thought is necessary before crafting any specific item. The crafting is also done real-time, adding a sense of urgency to the act that helps with the overall tone of the game. The gameplay in The Last of Us is easily my favorite in a Naughty Dog game in a long time. The satisfying combat and masterful stealth make up gameplay that is fun and interesting. It is a part of the game that shouldn’t be overlooked as it absolutely helps the game’s overall feel of terror and urgency.

The Verdict

The Last of Us is a true gaming masterpiece. Its story is extremely well-written and provides twists and turns throughout the story to keep you engaged throughout until the very meaningful ending that will keep you thinking long after the game is finished. The stellar performances by Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson as Joel and Ellie provide a true sense of realism in the game as their relationship becomes closer between themselves and the people they meet throughout the story. The game looks fantastic with small details everywhere around the world. It has a beautiful soundtrack that engages you in the moment, whether it be sad or thrilling. The multiplayer is an innovative experience with a story that will keep you coming back for more. Finally, the gameplay is the best Naughty Dog has made so far. It is satisfying and thrilling. These all play into the game’s overall terrifying and urgent tone that is made clear everywhere. This game is one of the best games I have ever played. It lets the PS3 go out with a bang into the new generation of consoles. It is a near perfect experience that every gamer should play, no matter what.

+ Fantastic Story

+ Superb Voice Acting

+ Beautiful Graphics

+ Fun and Engaging Multiplayer

+ Fantastic Gameplay

The Last of Us: 10/10

-Nooch

***SPOILERS***

Here’s our add-on to Episode 2 of Podcast Infinite. It’s a spoilercast for our favorite game of all time, The Last of Us. We discuss numerous plot points in detail. Our discussion starts with our thoughts and opinions on the game’s ending! We all read and answer a listener’s email pertaining to Ellie on the show! Give it a listen but please understand this is a SPOILERcast, so the whole episode spoils The Last of Us. Don’t listen if you haven’t beaten the game. Enjoy All-stars!

-Kyle

What’s up All-stars? Here’s Episode 2 of Podcast Infinite.┬áNooch has been playing just about every game imaginable in the past week. Ryan got into a car accident and felt like he was in an episode of Cops. Oh Chicago… And Kyle finished The Last of Us but is way too tired from working too much. We have Ryan play a little “There’s No Way” with this week’s news. We also explain where the name of our show came from! Come on by for a few smiles!

We record every Thursday and release the show by Friday afternoon! Thanks for listening to our podcast! We’ll be on iTunes soon.

-Kyle

Hey All-stars!

You’ve found the brand new website for Podcast Infinite! First and foremost, thanks for listening! You are why we record every single week. Share with your family and friends! If you’re new to Podcast Infinite, we are a weekly conversational podcast. We talk about everything video games by honing in on our passion; the Playstation brand. It’s not straight news from the industry. We keep it lively and entertaining by being conversational! We talk about whatever we want and get on some amazing tangents! Come on by and take a listen. You just might get hooked!

We will be doing A LOT of things on our page, including reviewing video games. We are looking for writers to help us write blog posts about everything video games. If you want first dibs, shoot us an email at podcastinfinite@gmail.com.

There’s much more to come, All-stars! PI!

-Kyle